Introducing: Kristen Hodge

Kristen Hodge, University ProductsUniversity Products is pleased to announce that Kristen Hodge has joined our staff as an Account Manager within the Archival Materials Market.  Kristen has worked with members of the museum and library community for more than five years and has an expansive knowledge of archival storage materials.  In her new position, Kristen will be visiting key accounts in an effort to understand individual institutional needs and requirements, and assisting in finding products to meet those needs.  Her responsibilities will also include sourcing and developing new products and attending various tradeshows to exhibit and promote University Products’ complete line of museum supplies.  Please join us in welcoming Kristen to the University Products family.  You can reach her in her office at 413-493-2342 or on her mobile phone at 315-247-7193, or email her at kehodge@universityproducts.com.

University Products is the leading supplier of archival storage materials for conservation, preservation, restoration and exhibition.  The company’s 400+ page full color catalog features the most comprehensive offering of archival storage supplies, conservation tools and equipment, and museum and gallery mount-making and display products.  University Products provides photographers with a full line of photographic storage and display products through its ApresFoto brand.  In addition, the company also manufactures the LINECO brand of framing and craft products

War and Art

Moscow’s Central Museum of Ancient Russian Culture and Art is named after Andrei Rublev, a great medieval painter of Orthodox icons and frescoes. Located in the buildings of Andronikov Monastery, where the master died sometime in late 1420s, museum is home to a vast collection of Russia’s most important religious art treasures. Peaceful and beautiful, the icons and paintings grace the walls of the monastery since the museum was opened after the WWII. in 1947. There’s also a large collection of hand-written and printed books.

When they packed a large exposition of XV-XVII century icons to travel to Kiev, Ukraine last year, the museum workers had no idea, how sudden and uneasy would be their return. But despite the tremulous events of the last few weeks, the entire collection was carefully packed and safely delivered back to Moscow, with great assistance from the workers of Ukraine’s National Sanctuary Complex “Sophia of Kiev” where the exhibit was supposed to be open through March. Once again, as art overcame war, there’s hope…